Re-writing a Broken Act (Dec./Jan. 2019)

Tom-Black
Tom Black

Here it is, 2019. It’s amazing how fast time goes by when you are looking back. It doesn’t seem that long ago that the landowners decided to challenge the constitutionality of the OSPCA Act.

The fact is that was back in 2013. The OLA decided that we had no choice but to try to change this legislation that had empowered the animal rights extremists as they terrorized the rural countryside in Ontario, destroying the lives of people who didn’t have the resources to hire lawyers and defend themselves. The enforcers often made promises to return the animals if big fines were paid along with large vet bills and boarding fees that ranged from $2000 to $50,000.

The horse on the front cover is one such animal. Taken from his owner on Manitoulan Island along with many others, the OSPCA claimed that the horses were abused because they
had chipped hooves and burrs in their manes. Many horses were taken and not returned even though the owner paid them thousands of dollars. Endless phone calls over several years to the OLA from distraught victims of this legislation, convinced us that we had to do something to rectify the problem.

Lawyer Kurtis Andrews felt that the police powers for a charity was unconstitutional as well as some of the ‘removal without trial’ clauses in the act and he recommended that we do a constitutional challenge. The thought was that the justice system always wants to be sure they are on the right track and would be sympathetic to us asking the question, as long as we were paying our own way and not looking for money if we were right. Unfortunately for us, the justice system does not always want to be proven ‘just or unjust’. Many players got involved to discourage our case going forward.

We must, at this time, give OLA Acting President, Jeff Bogaerts all our thanks and appreciation for putting his name, his time and his risk of costs on the line for the betterment of his fellow citizens of Ontario. We also would like to thank all of the donators who helped us continue when the path forward looked pretty gloomy. They believed we had a case and were there to see it through. A special thanks to Shirley Dolan for all the time she spent keeping donations accounted for and the cheques written to pay the bills.

At this time, I would like to invite all the animal associations and groups to get in touch with me or the PC government and ask them to help coordinate the input from your groups concerns, so that we can get new legislation created that deals fairly with animals and people. Don’t wait for other groups to fix the problem, get involved. The door is open on this file and if normal people don’t protect their rights and those of the animals in our society, then the extremists from both sides will create the rules.

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Re-writing a Broken Act (Dec./Jan. 2019)

Tom-Black
Tom Black

Here it is, 2019. It’s amazing how fast time goes by when you are looking back. It doesn’t seem that long ago that the landowners decided to challenge the constitutionality of the OSPCA Act.

The fact is that was back in 2013. The OLA decided that we had no choice but to try to change this legislation that had empowered the animal rights extremists as they terrorized the rural countryside in Ontario, destroying the lives of people who didn’t have the resources to hire lawyers and defend themselves. The enforcers often made promises to return the animals if big fines were paid along with large vet bills and boarding fees that ranged from $2000 to $50,000.

The horse on the front cover is one such animal. Taken from his owner on Manitoulan Island along with many others, the OSPCA claimed that the horses were abused because they
had chipped hooves and burrs in their manes. Many horses were taken and not returned even though the owner paid them thousands of dollars. Endless phone calls over several years to the OLA from distraught victims of this legislation, convinced us that we had to do something to rectify the problem.

Lawyer Kurtis Andrews felt that the police powers for a charity was unconstitutional as well as some of the ‘removal without trial’ clauses in the act and he recommended that we do a constitutional challenge. The thought was that the justice system always wants to be sure they are on the right track and would be sympathetic to us asking the question, as long as we were paying our own way and not looking for money if we were right. Unfortunately for us, the justice system does not always want to be proven ‘just or unjust’. Many players got involved to discourage our case going forward.

We must, at this time, give OLA Acting President, Jeff Bogaerts all our thanks and appreciation for putting his name, his time and his risk of costs on the line for the betterment of his fellow citizens of Ontario. We also would like to thank all of the donators who helped us continue when the path forward looked pretty gloomy. They believed we had a case and were there to see it through. A special thanks to Shirley Dolan for all the time she spent keeping donations accounted for and the cheques written to pay the bills.

At this time, I would like to invite all the animal associations and groups to get in touch with me or the PC government and ask them to help coordinate the input from your groups concerns, so that we can get new legislation created that deals fairly with animals and people. Don’t wait for other groups to fix the problem, get involved. The door is open on this file and if normal people don’t protect their rights and those of the animals in our society, then the extremists from both sides will create the rules.

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